Microwave Marshmallow Experiment – TinkerLab

Microwave Marshmallow Experiment

Have you heard of the microwave marshmallow experiment? It ’ s actually simple and a fun way to explore how the volume of gas expands a marshmallow as it heats up. My kids besides enjoy this experiment because it mixes science ( + playfulness ) with a sugary regale .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab

Microwave Marshmallow Experiment Supplies

  • 4 (or more) Marshmallows
  • Paper Towel or Microwave-safe plate
  • Microwave
  • Paper to jot down observations (I’ll share my 3-year old’s observations in italics below)

For this microwave marshmallow experiment, we ’ ll microwave three marshmallows for different periods of time, and then compare what happens to the marshmallows as they heat up, and then cool down again. This is an engaging way to involve children in scientific observation and discovery, it raises lots of questions, and doesn ’ triiodothyronine require a set of homework or clean-up. Are you with me ?

Step One

Microwave one marshmallow for 10 seconds and remove from the microwave. Compare it to an uncooked marshmallow and describe how it looks. How does it feel ?
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab Observation: It ’ second small, shorter than the other marshmallow, but fat. It ’ s gooey .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab

Step Two

Microwave the second marshmallow for 30 seconds and remove it. How does it compare with an uncooked marshmallow ? What happens to it as it cools ?
Observation: It ’ s a little moment larger than the other one. It got dry as it cooled .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab
Touching the moment marshmallow .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab
Cool, a little hole showed up in the center after it cooled down a bit.

The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab

Step Three

Microwave the one-third marshmallow for 50 seconds and remove from the microwave. Compare to and uncooked marshmallow mighty aside and after it cools. How are they different ? How does this marshmallow feel ?
Observation: It ’ s huge and wrinkled and dry. It ’ mho brown. That means it burned. That means it ’ s good to eat. Crunchy to eat .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab You can see all three marshmallows hera. We noticed that the 30 second and 50 second marshmallows got hard and crunchy as they cooled, and N decided to taste them for a relish comparison .
The fun and simple microwave marshmallow experiment | Tinkerlab The 50 second marshmallow was brown, crunchy, and caramelized. Have you ever tried astronaut ice cream ? It had a similar texture .
The science behind the activity is  explained intelligibly over here at The Exploratorium. In essence, the volume of flatulence in the marshmallow increases when the temperature increases, and then decreases as it cools down. The Exploratorium suggests not microwave marshmallows for longer than 2 minutes, less you want a dark, icky, burn mess on your hands .
This visualize was inspired by a reserve we found at the library : Kitchen Science Experiments : How Does Your Mold Garden Grow ?

Have you ever microwaved anything and been surprised by the outcome?

Science for kids microwave marshmallow experiment copy

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